Home arrow The PI Forum
The PI Club
Welcome, Guest
Please Login or Register.    Lost Password?
The Ground Segment of the EGR Mission
(1 viewing) 1 Guest
It is proposed that the purpose for the first interstellar mission be to establish a new human civilization in another solar system.
Go to bottom
TOPIC: The Ground Segment of the EGR Mission
#32
johnhunt (User)
Fresh Boarder
Posts: 5
graphgraph
User Offline Click here to see the profile of this user
Re:The Ground Segment of the EGR Mission 8 Years, 5 Months ago Karma: 0  
> there are specific tasks to be done... e.g. to be able to switch off EGR in case, we need to.

If humanity dies there is a need to keep EGR going. If humanity survives the EGR mission will become irrelevant. Humanity will be so technologically advanced that they will be well established at the target planet by the time the EGR craft arrives. They can switch it off then. There is no need to keep a ground segment going when the craft is in hibernate mode and would be, by necessity, designed to need no external help.

> keep track of the mission - how to find it after 100 or 500 or ... years?

Why, what does it matter? If humanity survives it will be so advanced that it will eventually be able to locate a craft whose approximate trajectory is known.

> This activity would yield useful data even in the case if the doomsday scenario - the very ground of EGR - will not come.

Fine, provided that this "spin-off" benefit is not needed to justify the mission nor will slow down its launch. The EGR mission is justified by the need to ensure that humanity continues, which is justification enough (unless we can be quite confident that an alternate approach will work which Fermi would seem to argue against).
 
Logged Logged  
  The administrator has disabled public write access.
#33
tpacher (Moderator)
Moderator
Posts: 23
graph
User Offline Click here to see the profile of this user
Re:The Ground Segment of the EGR Mission 8 Years, 5 Months ago Karma: 0  
johnhunt wrote:
> If humanity survives ... Humanity will be so technologically advanced ... This is only one possible outcome. There are many others, e.g. a backfall into dark ages. There are examples for this in human history and such scenarios are discussed widely in various SF stories as well. Nothing ensures that a survival after severe crises results quickly in a very advanced civilization.
> Fine, provided that this "spin-off" benefit is not needed to justify the mission nor will slow down its launch. The EGR mission is justified by the need to ensure that humanity continues, which is justification enough (unless we can be quite confident that an alternate approach will work which Fermi would seem to argue against). Spin-offs like this would not be needed for justification of an EGR mission. But it would not be clever not to take such a piggyback, which would not jeopardize any EGR project, the other parts being much more demanding. A small dust detector e.g. would cause a negligible impact on the project.
 
Logged Logged  
  The administrator has disabled public write access.
#34
tpacher (Moderator)
Moderator
Posts: 23
graph
User Offline Click here to see the profile of this user
Re:The Ground Segment of the EGR Mission 8 Years, 5 Months ago Karma: 0  
> If humanity survives ... Humanity will be so technologically advanced ... This is only one possible outcome. There are many others, e.g. a backfall into dark ages. There are examples for this in human history and such scenarios are discussed widely in various SF stories as well. Nothing ensures that a survival after severe crises results quickly in a very advanced civilization. See Paul Gilster's recent post on Centauri Dreams Of Technological Lifetimes and Survival, here a short quote:Is the movement toward ever more sophisticated technology irreversible? If youíve studied history, the answer is obviously no. Various speculations arise from this ó Carl Sagan once opined that without the intervening collapse known as the Dark Ages, we might have seen a Greek civilization exploring near-Earth space a thousand years ago. Itís also likely that no law prevents another collapse into technological and scientific somnolence, perhaps sparked by war, or disease, or economic catastrophe.
 
Logged Logged  
 
Last Edit: 2009/07/01 22:23 By tpacher.
  The administrator has disabled public write access.
Go to top
© 2007 - 2017 The PI Club
Operated by peregrinus * consulting software services